Business Administration

Faculty/Staff

Aaron Moses, AdventHealth Endowed Chair of Business Administration; Satyanarayana RamellaChanda Santo

Adjunct: Scott Cain, Throy Cambell, Alex Falcon, Brad Masters, Judith Miles, Catalin Pavel, Gilbert Werema, Licci Zemleduch

Mission

The Department of Business Administration prepares students for Christian service and business leadership in the global economy. Our department is built on academic excellence, integrity, and an entrepreneurial spirit. We serve and value a diverse student body, equipping them with the intellectual fortitude to change the world.

Aims of the Department

  • Maintain a curriculum that provides students with the necessary knowledge for successful work experience in today's business environment and graduate studies.
  • Promote student's awareness of free enterprise with an international orientation within a framework of moral and ethical guidelines.
  • Enrich the learning-teaching experience by fostering access to and utilization of appropriate learning resources.
  • Promote faculty and student's involvement in community activities.

 

B.B.A.

For a dual concentration (ex. Management/Marketing) the student must declare a dual concentration as part of their BBA degree. A minimum of 18 credit hours is required for each concentration. The student must understand that with the additional credit hours, graduation time may be extended. Only required concentration courses will be allowed to overlap between the two concentrations. A course taken as part of one of the concentration's required courses cannot be used as an elective choice in the other concentration. Planning the two concentrations must be done with the aid of the student's advisor.

ACCT 211 : Accounting Principles I

Nature of accounting data and its use in business, fundamental procedures and records, operating cycle, preparation of financial statements, measurement of income and assets.

credits

3

ACCT 212 : Accounting Principles II

Accounting procedures and practices in partnerships and corporations, development of accounting data for use in management decisions, financial statement analysis, cash flow, income tax.

credits

3

Prerequisites

ACCT 315 : Intermediate Accounting I

An in-depth study of the theory and techniques of financial accounting, including an accounting conceptual framework, a review of the accounting process and financial statement presentation, liabilities, and accounting concerns and standards relating to both current and noncurrent assets. This course covers materials and methods tested on the CPA exam.

credits

4

Prerequisites

ACCT 316 : Intermediate Accounting II

A continuation of ACCT 315 emphasizing the application of accounting theory and standards to liabilities, equity, revenue recognition, leases, post-retirement benefits, income taxes, financial analysis, and accounting prices. Approximately one-quarter of this course deals with accounting research. This course covers materials and methods tested on the CPA exam.

credits

4

Prerequisites

ACCT 317 : Cost Accounting

An in-depth study of the technical aspects of cost accounting systems including cost allocations; joint product and by-product accounting; actual, standard, and direct cost methods. Process costing is emphasized. This course covers materials tested on the CPA exam.

credits

3

Prerequisites

ACCT 319 : Fund Accounting

Special accounting procedures for units of government and other not-for-profit organizations. This course covers materials and methods tested on the CPA exam.

credits

3

Prerequisites

ACCT 412 : Auditing

A study of the theory and practice of auditing, with an emphasis on auditor compliance with governmental and professional regulations as well as ethical standards and on the detection of fraud. This course covers materials and methods tested on the CPA exam.

credits

3

Prerequisites

ACCT 415 : Advanced Accounting

A study of advanced accounting and financial reporting topics including business combinations and consolidated financial statements, partnerships and branches, bankruptcy, multinational enterprises, and segments. This course covers materials and methods tested on the CPA exam.

credits

3

Prerequisites

ACCT 417 : Accounting Information Systems

A conceptual foundation of accounting information systems with emphasis on security, internal controls and setting up a computerized system using commercial accounting software.

credits

3

Prerequisites

ACCT 418 : Federal Income Taxes

A study of the provisions of federal income tax laws as they apply to individuals, corporations, and other taxpayers. Emphasis is on personal income taxes, the various types of income, and the deductibility of costs and expenses in the determination of tax liability. Approximately one-quarter of this course deals with tax accounting research. This course covers materials and methods tested on the CPA exam.

credits

4

Prerequisites

ACCT 492 : Accounting Internship

This course is an on-the-job, career-oriented internship program for training in accounting. Variable credit of 3-8 semester hours is available. Admission to internship is limited to students who have completed 40 semester hours in the business core and concentration and have maintained a GPA of at least 2.50 in the major. Prior approval of the business internship coordinator and department chair are required before the internship is started. The internship may count as one three-hour elective course in the accounting concentration. Note: A student may not exceed a total of 8 hours for ACCT 492, BUAD 492, and MKTG 492 combined. Eligible for IP grading. Grading is Pass/Fail.

credits

3 - 8

ACCT 498 : Individual Study Topics

Designed for the student who wishes to do independent study or research. Content and method of study must be arranged prior to registration. May be repeated for a total of 3 credits.

credits

1 - 3

Prerequisites

Permission of department chair

BSLM 310 : Introduction to Senior Living Administration

This course will explore the philosophy and competitive environment of the senior living industry in the United States, including assisted living, independent living, and memory care communities. The federal and state laws and regulations applicable to the classification, construction, and operation of senior living communities will be reviewed and the student will become familiar with the Texas licensing standards for assisted living. The management and marketing of senior living communities, including legal and ethical considerations, will also be covered.

credits

3

BSLM 320 : Resident-Centered Care and Services

This course will discuss how to provide excellent quality of care and customer service to all senior living facility stakeholders. Topics covered will include the aging process, person-centered care, service operations, family care considerations, senior healthcare, and memory care training.

credits

3

BSLM 492 : Senior Living Internship

An on-the-job, career-oriented internship program for training in senior living management. Variable credit of 3-8 semester hours is available. Admission to internship is limited to students who have completed 40 semester hours in the business core and concentration and have maintained a GPA of at least 2.50 in the major. Prior approval of the business internship coordinator and department chair are required before the internship is started.

credits

3 - 8

BUAD 120 : Personal Finance

An introduction to personal financial planning and the impact of economics, environment, age, geographic location, personal income and career choice on personal finances. Some topics include planning processes, budgets, taxes, credit, loans, insurance, investing and retirement planning.

credits

3

BUAD 202 : Introduction to Contemporary Business

An introduction to business models and functions within the current cultural and technological environments. Careers in each of the major areas of Business and common career orientation skills are introduced. The course further aims to provide practical research skills that are commonly used in the different functions of business. Additionally, the course serves as an instrument where the students' knowledge of business upon entering the program can be assessed as well as a place to introduce graduation requirements of the business program. Portfolio requirements are covered. Class Fee.

credits

3

BUAD 211 : Profiles of Entrepreneurship

A course exploring the essence of entrepreneurship as expressed by leading experts in the field and visiting business professionals who share their personal experience. Emphasis is placed on innovation and teamwork as class members engage in new venture development.

credits

3

BUAD 230 : History of Game Development

This course covers the history and evolution of electronic game development, focusing on technical innovations, design elements, and societal influence. The course will provide an overview of various software and hardware developments for the gaming industry, as well as examine the roles of designers, artists, programmers, and writers. Students will gain a global and historic view of the interactive entertainment field and its origins within the context of the game development process.

Offered every semester via Rize Consortium.

credits

3

BUAD 231 : Introduction to Game Design

This course is intended as an introduction to the fundamental principles of game creation, game design and narrative design. Students will gain an overview of the game creation process, learn how to analyze games and game elements, and gain practical experience in the first steps of game creation - proposals, storyboards and paper prototypes.

Offered every semester via Rize Consortium.

credits

3

BUAD 240 : Introduction to Esports Management

Intro to Esports Management starts with an introduction to the history of competitive gaming and continues with an exploration of its emerging ecosystem. Students will learn the complexities involved in understanding the dynamics of the esports industry and all of its stakeholders from gamers to billion-dollar media companies. We will dive into each element of this value chain and provide you with insight into the interoperations of all companies included in the landscape of esports.

Students will learn to navigate the structure of esports leagues, teams, players, gaming publishers, tournament operators, media, and affiliate organizations. Relevant projects, market analysis, and critical thinking will be utilized to understand management approaches that have succeeded and failed with recent esports ventures. Students will also learn baseline skills in esports streaming, broadcasting, marketing, public relations, and written communication.

credits

3

BUAD 241 : Convention, Event and Trade Show Planning

One of the major ways in which games are marketed to consumers is the convention. Shows like the Tokyo Game Show, PAX and E3 attract audiences ranging from 60,000 - 300,000 and serve as one of the best opportunities for game studios to generate excitement and favorable word-of-mouth for upcoming projects. Successfully executing a company presence at one of these shows requires a working understanding of budgeting, goal setting, demo creation, logistics, staffing, merchandising, and ROI evaluation, all topics covered in this course.

credits

3

BUAD 250 : Entrepreneurial Service Learning

Course open to business and non-business students who desire to learn the intricacies of project management and leadership through practice. Students will work as part of
entrepreneurial teams to plan, design, develop, implement and evaluate projects. Projects will be focused on the improvement of economic, social or environmental issues in for-profit and non-profit settings. Each team will work independently, with the guidance of industry mentors and faculty coaches, to develop and implement specific projects. Enactus will be used as a means for accomplishing the practical aspects of the course. Course may be repeated.

credits

1

BUAD 270 : Management Information Systems

The fundamentals of information systems: hardware and software, extensive information on database systems, telecommunications, electronic commerce, and knowledge management. Spreadsheet applications will also be covered in depth.

credits

3

Prerequisites

Grade of at least 70 on the computer entrance test, or CSIS 102 or CSIS 110 or permission of the department.

BUAD 280 : Introduction to Project Management

There are two basic approaches to project management - waterfall, and agile. Students will become familiar with both through this course. This course also introduces students to vital project-management concepts, including the lifecycle of projects. Students will also develop an understanding of how individual projects - and the larger programs they make up - fit within the context of an organization.

This course is essential for any students wishing to pursue an education in project management and helpful for students who wish to gain an understanding of the role of project management within the modern workforce.

credits

3

BUAD 298 : Individual Study Topics

Designed for the student who wishes to do independent study or research. Content and method of study must be arranged prior to registration. Alternatively, Selected Topics may be used for teaching special courses on a limited basis that are not listed otherwise in the bulletin. This class may be repeated for different topics.

credits

1 - 3

BUAD 299 : Directed Group Study Topics

Provides academic departments an opportunity to offer courses in specialized or experimental areas, either lower or upper division, not listed in the undergraduate Bulletin.  . May be repeated for a total of 3 credits.

credits

1 - 3

Prerequisites

Approval by department chair

BUAD 301 : Principles of Management

A foundation course introducing the key management function of planning, organizing, leading, and controlling. Emphasis placed on leading and managing international organizations in a global economy and marketplace.

credits

3

BUAD 302 : Advanced Software Applications

Information systems, components of the Office suite, and integration of the individual software packages with one another and the Internet. Projects will challenge students to apply advanced software functions to real-life business scenarios.

credits

3

BUAD 311 : Business Law

A study of the legal issues confronted in business operations. A general overview of the legal environment is presented, followed by an in-depth examination of contract law and the law of agency. This course covers materials tested on the CPA exam.

credits

3

BUAD 317 : Business Communication

This course is designed to survey the principles and forms of communication frequently found in domestic and international organizations. Emphasis on oral and written communication theory and practice. This covers materials tested on the CPA Exam.

credits

3

BUAD 332 : Distribution of Games

The role of a publisher in the games industry is to ensure that a game can get in front of its audience successfully. To do that, a publisher must consider a variety of distribution strategies and channels. This course explains the role of a publisher in-game distribution and details the various channels by which a game can be distributed.

Offered every semester via Rize Consortium.

credits

3

Prerequisites

BUAD 372 : Human Resources Management

A course designed to provide a working knowledge of personnel functions, with emphasis on recruitment, selection, training, job design, performance evaluation, wage/salary administration, and compliance with regulation.

credits

3

BUAD 374 : Training and Development

Training and staff development are keys to building an empowered and motivated workforce. This course is designed to help students develop knowledge and skill in the design, development, delivery, and evaluation of organizational training. It will also help students build skills in creating effective performance improvement programs, a vital resource in talent retention that is often overlooked. Lastly, students will be required to produce their own sample training plan.

credits

3

Prerequisites

BUAD 375 : Total Compensation Management

A study of the total compensation management function in business, as evidenced through the human resource framework. Major areas of activity will include job analysis, job evaluation, establishing pay structures, and benefits.

credits

3

Prerequisites

BUAD 376 : Employment and Labor Law

This course is an overview of various laws and regulations that determine the rights and obligations of employees and employers. Topics covered include the nature of the employment relationship and common law principles, prohibitions against discrimination on the basis of certain protected characteristics such as race and gender, wage and hour law, the Family Medical Leave Act, the National Labor Relations Act, and other similar areas of labor and employment law. The primary focus is on federal laws governing the employment relationship, but there will also be discussion of state and local laws.

Offered every semester via Rize Consortium.

credits

3

Prerequisites

BUAD 377 : Human Resource Risk Management

This course examines the scope and role of HR in the occupational health and safety arena, the fundamental components of comprehensive programs and, more importantly, the interplay between these considerations and how important HR professionals are in their success. Topics covered include OSHA requirements, risk management and loss prevention, management of safety & workers’ compensation, employee assistance plans, preventative health issues, emergency response and preparedness, and developing a culture of safety, amongst others. There will be focus on the fundamental components of a comprehensive health and safety program to protect the employees in an organization and costly liability.

Offered every semester via Rize Consortium.

credits

3

Prerequisites

BUAD 420 : Project Management

Covers the essential tools, concepts and best practices of project management being used in today’s real world. The course uses a managerial process approach that includes initiation, planning, executing, controlling and closing phases of a project. Some course topics include strategy and project selection, project definition, project times and costs, scheduling resources and costs, risk, and progress/performance measurement and evaluation. The course also utilizes information from the Project Management Institute (PMI) and the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK®) and will contribute to the preparation needed to pass the CAPM (Certified Associate in Project Management) certification exam.

credits

3

BUAD 423 : Organizational Behavior

A study of the understanding, prediction, and control of human behavior within organizations. Topics include motivation, learning, leadership, diversity, communication, interpersonal behavior, group dynamics, decision-making and change.

credits

3

Prerequisites

BUAD 453 : Cross-Cultural Studies

A study of communication between cultures in an ever-changing world. This course will examine the interdependent global society, the structure and identity of culture, worldviews and cultural values. The effects of cross cultural communication, both verbal and nonverbal, in business settings will be examined. Practical applications are made for cultural differences, management expectations, and marketing practices.

credits

3

BUAD 466 : Production and Operations Management

A study and analysis of the planning, design, direction, and control of physical and human resources used in the production of goods and services. Emphasis is placed on solutions to operational problems in the physical, locational, storage, and general service subsystems.

credits

3

Prerequisites

BUAD 467 : Supply Chain Analysis

A study and analysis of the lean supply chain. Emphasis is placed in forecasting methods, demand analysis and the integration of demand into the production schedule throughout the value chain. Integrates advanced statistics and simulations.

credits

3

Prerequisites

Recommended: BUAD 466

BUAD 468 : Logistics Management

A focused course within the supply chain, emphasizing the modes of transportation available, cost, timing, service and tradeoffs with overall production strategy. Explores storage and movement of goods throughout the production cycle.

credits

3

Prerequisites

Recommended: BUAD 466

BUAD 469 : Quality Control and Improvement

A demonstration of mastery and technical proficiency in statistics and quality control, as prescribed very various different quality management systems such as Six Sigma and Agile. This includes foundations, measurement, analysis, improvement and controlling phases. Course includes a hands-on project for quality evaluation and improvement and a comprehensive exam. Students who pass the exam will earn an internationally recognized certification in quality management such as Six Sigma or Agile. 

credits

3

Prerequisites

BUAD 470 : Business Intelligence and Analytics

A practical course combining applied statistics and database software. Emphasis is placed on obtaining and extrapolating data to develop reports, workflows, schedules and operational decisions in the context of linear programming.

credits

3

Prerequisites

Recommended: BUAD 466

BUAD 472 : Business Policies and Strategies

Subject to prior permission of department chair. An integrative capstone course that explains what policies are, how they relate to strategies, and how a manager builds a strategic dimension into his or her actions. Any problem or opportunity - accounting, management, marketing, finance, production, organizational, personnel or other organizational dimensions - if it materially affects a firm's performance, is of strategic concern. The Peregrine Business Administration Common Professional Component exam is taken and student participates in the Business Strategy Game simulation. Portfolio requirement and completion is covered. Lab Fee. Class Fee.

credits

3

Prerequisites

Open only to seniors majoring in the department. Subject to prior permission of department chair.

BUAD 492 : Business Internship

An on-the-job, career-oriented internship program for training in business or operations management. Variable credit of 3-8 semester hours is available. Admission to internship is limited to students who have completed 40 semester hours in the business core and concentration and have maintained a GPA of at least 2.50 in the major. Prior approval of the business internship coordinator and department chair are required before the internship is started. The internship may count as one three-hour elective course in the management or operations management concentrations. Note: A student may not exceed a total of 8 hours for BUAD 492, ACCT 492, FNCE 492, IBUS 492, and MKTG 492 combined. Eligible for IP grading. Grading is Pass/Fail.

credits

3 - 8

BUAD 498 : Individual Study Topics

Designed for the student who wishes to do independent study or research. Content and method of study must be arranged prior to registration. Alternatively, Selected Topics may be used for teaching special courses on a limited basis that are not listed otherwise in the bulletin. This class may be repeated for different topics.

credits

1 - 3

BUAD 499 : Directed Group Study Topics

Provides academic departments an opportunity to offer courses in specialized or experimental areas, either lower or upper division, not listed in the undergraduate Bulletin.  Student may be allowed to repeat the course for credit.

credits

1 - 3

Prerequisites

Approval by department chair

ECON 211 : Macroeconomics

A basic study of macroeconomics which includes national problems such as supply and demand, growth, output and productivity, inflation, employment, interest rates, trade balance, and fiscal and monetary policies.

credits

3

ECON 212 : Microeconomics

A basic study of microeconomics which includes supply and demand theory, production and operation cost theory, consumer theory, price theory, competition, market structures, economics of the firm, and the role of government.

credits

3

ECON 401 : Managerial Economics

A course designed to integrate advanced microeconomics theory and analysis into the strategy and analysis used in business management, operations, marketing and finance. Course will evaluate fundamentals of industry competition; the structure of markets and how firms participate in these markets; growth and consolidation of markets and governmental responses; analysis of market power; the predictive behavior of firms from the framework of a game model; competitive behaviors of firms that include price discrimination, collusion and vertical integration, industrial regulation and public policy.

credits

3

Prerequisites

Recommended: MATH 141

FNCE 321 : Business Finance

A survey of the field of finance, both private and public. Emphasis is placed on current problems in the field. Financial institutions are discussed, and loans and investment practices are analyzed.

credits

3

Prerequisites

FNCE 422 : Portfolio Management

This course will focus on portfolio optimization and asset allocation, the basics of bond pricing and debt portfolio management, the theory of asset pricing models and their pricing and debt portfolio management, the theory of asset pricing models and their implications for investment as well as techniques for evaluating investment management performance. The course will build upon the analytical skills developed in Financial Management. Class Fee.

credits

3

Prerequisites

FNCE 433 : Investment Principles

Provides the student with the tools necessary for evaluating investments, including stocks, bonds, options and commodities. Evaluate the organization of securities markets, mutual fund investing, efficient market hypothesis, and fundamental analysis and valuation. Additionally, it presents a systematic methodology for constructing efficient portfolios and evaluating portfolio performance. Class Fee.

credits

3

Prerequisites

FNCE 450 : Working Capital Management

This course includes topics addressing short-term financial management and covers the cost to benefit trade-offs of liquidity, management of working capital, management and budgeting of cash, short-term investing and financing issues.

credits

3

Prerequisites

FNCE 452 : International Finance

Financial management and economic theory in the international environment. The impact of regulation, taxation, capital and money markets, working capital management, capital budgeting, risk, and exchange rates on decision-making are considered. Consideration is also given to the development and application of economic principles within the world economy. Class Fee.

credits

3

Prerequisites

FNCE 455 : Corporate Finance

A course exploring advanced topics in corporate financial management. The objective is to focus on the factors that influence the decisions of corporate managers and the impact of those decisions on the value creation of the firm in terms of working capital, capital investment, capital structure, and shareholder distribution. The course will cover working capital issues, advanced capital budgeting, capital structure, leases, hybrid securities, hedging and specific derivatives, shareholder distributions, mergers, divestitures, firm failure and some international financial management areas.

credits

3

Prerequisites

FNCE 492 : Finance Internship

An on-the-job, career-oriented internship program for training in Finance. Variable credit of 3-8 semester hours is available. Admission to internship is limited to students
who have completed 40 semester hours in the business core and concentration and have maintained a GPA of at least 2.50 in the major. Prior approval of the business
internship coordinator and department chair are required before the internship is started. The internship may count as one three-hour elective course in the Finance
concentration. Note: A student may not exceed a total of 8 hours for BUAD 492, ACCT 492, FNCE 492, IBUS 492, and MKTG 492 combined. Eligible for IP grading. Grading is pass/fail.

credits

3 - 8

Prerequisites

40 semester hours in the business core

FNCE 493 : Money and Banking

This course addresses classical and contemporary issues in the theory of money, banking, and financial institutions. Topics covered include: the gold standard, the structure of central banks and the Federal Reserve system, theories of money demand and money supply, the relationship between money supply and overall economic activity, the theoretical and practical aspects of monetary policies and money creation, the efficacy of fiscal policies versus monetary policies, and the role the Federal Reserve plays in economic stabilization. We shall pay particular attention to the money creation plays in economic stabilization. We shall pay particular attention to the money creation process, to endogenous money versus exogenous money, and to the ability of the Federal Reserve to stabilize the economy.

credits

3

Prerequisites

IBUS 310 : International Business Study Tour

A course emphasizing a particular topic approached through travel and on-site visits to business-related locations associated with the specified topic. Subsidiary emphases of historical context, culture, language, and arts may be included to support and complement the business topic selected. The student will submit a research project as directed by the instructor. Specific topics may be applied toward the electives of a specific B.B.A concentration, as approved by the instructor and concentration adviser. To meet the requirements of the International Experience of the B.B.A. International Business degree, the student must attend a trip that primarily visits countries other than citizenship or permanent residency. May be repeated.

credits

3

IBUS 319 : International Business

A survey of how various cultures, social values, political and economic systems influence management and marketing practices throughout the world. The course will explore the nature of global trade, cross-border governance and regulations, foreign direct investment, international trade contracts, working in multiple currencies and multinational business corporate strategy.

credits

3

IBUS 492 : International Business Internship

An on-the-job, career-oriented internship program for training in international business. Variable credit of 3-8 semester hours is available. Admission to internship is limited to
students who have completed 40 semester hours in the business core and concentration and have maintained a GP A of at least 2.50 in the major. Prior approval of the business internship coordinator and department chair are required before the internship is started. The internship may count as one three-hour elective course in the International Business concentration, however, the student must work in a country other than citizenship or permanent residency. Note: A student may not exceed a total of 8 hours for BUAD 492, ACCT 492, FNCE 492, IBUS 492, and MKTG 492 combined. Eligible for IP grading. Grading is pass/fail.

credits

3 - 8

Prerequisites

40 semester hours in the business core

MKTG 237 : Video Production

This course includes segments on lighting, the video camera, the production switcher, equipment interconnection, digital nonlinear editing, and program production for television. Emphasis is given to multiple camera techniques for both studio and location productions. Supplies fee. (Also taught as COMM 237.)

credits

3

MKTG 241 : Public Relations

A course dealing with definitions, basic objectives, and concepts of public relations. Attention is given to the role of public relations, research for public relations, public and target audiences, communication concepts and channels, campaigns, and the legal and ethical environment of public relations. (Also taught as COMM 241.)

credits

3

Prerequisites

MKTG 270 : Social Media Strategy

This course introduces students to both the theory and application of today's social media platforms and digital tools. Students will explore the development and influence of user-generated content as well as strategic use of branded content, all in the context of managing multiple digital channels. We will study theories on how content goes viral and examine case studies on ways viral videos have impacted the reputation of individuals and corporations. Overall, students will learn best practices in social media marketing as used by content creators, brands and major institutions.

credits

3

MKTG 343 : Principles of Marketing

An introductory course dealing with basic marketing concepts. Emphasis is placed on managerial decisions to meet customer needs in the areas of product design, price, promotion, and distribution. Lab Fee.

credits

3

MKTG 350 : Consumer Behavior

An integration of marketing theory and the behavioral sciences in order to understand choices and influences in consumer decision behavior.

credits

3

Prerequisites

MKTG 351 : Advertising

This course studies the role of advertising in society, its impact on the economy, its function in business and marketing, and its communication aspects, including media applications. Attention is given to social, legal, and ethical considerations, the business of advertising, consumer behavior, and creative strategies and processes. (Also taught as COMM 351.)

credits

3

MKTG 362 : Email Marketing

Email marketing is one of the primary avenues by which modern businesses drive customer acquisition. This course will teach students how to craft successful email marketing campaigns when targeting business or individual customers. Students will also learn how to use email campaigns for customer engagement and activation.

Students will learn how to write emails that drive customers to take desired actions, and how to structure email campaigns for maximum effect. This course will ask students to build their own marketing campaigns to advertise an imaginary product, and to evaluate and improve existing email campaigns.

Offered every semester via Rize Consortium.

credits

3

Prerequisites

MKTG 430 : Search Engine Optimization (SEO) & Search Engine Marketing (SEM)

When a potential customer is looking for a product, how do they find the right one? Often times, they'll ask Google or other search engines. Search Engine Optimization (SEO) and Search Engine Marketing (SEM) help companies become more visible to customers by ensuring that they are among the first companies someone sees when doing initial research.

This course is intended to introduce students to the concepts of Social Media Marketing and Optimization, and teach them how to use these tools to drive top-of-funnel growth, also known as lead generation.

Offered every semester via Rize Consortium.

credits

3

Prerequisites

MKTG 440 : Digital Marketing Analytics

Marketing professionals today have access to incredible amounts of data. The ability to use this data is what differentiates successful marketing efforts from failed ones. In this course, students will learn how to analyze digital customer behavior data using a range of tools and use that data to test marketing hypotheses and improve customer acquisition.

Offered every semester via Rize Consortium.

credits

3

Prerequisites

MKTG 270 Social Media Marketing, MKTG 343 Principles of Marketing or MKTG 362 Email Marketing, or MKTG 430 Search Engine Optimization (SEO) and Search Engine Marketing (SEM)

MKTG 441 : Viral & Organic Growth

Viral and organic growth have become the gold standard by which content marketing efforts are judged. This type of growth is highly valuable because it tends to be relatively cost-efficient. Companies which generate content that spreads through the internet with minimal effort and cost are among the most successful at growing their brand awareness and user base. This course is intended to teach students what drives users to share content, how to build shareable content, and how to run contests and perform other activities that tend to lead to viral or organic growth.

Offered every semester via Rize Consortium.

credits

3

Prerequisites

MKTG 442 : Applied Advertising and Public Relations

This course uses team projects to teach the tools and techniques necessary to work in the fields of advertising and public relations. Advertising assignments may include, but are not limited to, image and identity, political advertising, jingles and slogans, campaigns for large and small companies, and demographic and psychographic research. Public relations assignments may include, but are not limited to, crisis management, special events, media relations, publications, and internal communications. (Also taught as COMM 442.)

credits

3

MKTG 443 : Marketing Research

An overview of research theories, concepts, and methodologies as applied to marketing problems. Attention is directed toward the application of sampling, sample design, data analysis of marketing problems, and how findings are used in formulating marketing policies.

credits

3

Prerequisites

MKTG 492 : Marketing Internship

This course is an on-the-job, career-oriented internship program for training in marketing and e-commerce. Variable credit of 3-8 hours is available. Admission to internship is limited to students who have completed 40 semester hours in the business core and concentration and have maintained a GPA of at least 2.50 in the major. Prior approval of both the business internship coordinator and the department chair is required before the internship is started. The internship may count as one three-hour elective course in the marketing concentration. 45 work hours for each internship credit are needed. Note: A student may not exceed a total of 8 hours for MKTG 492, ACCT 492 and BUAD 492 combined. Eligible for IP grading. Grading is Pass/Fail.

credits

3 - 8