History & Social Science

Faculty/Staff

R. Steven Jones, Chair; Elizabeth Bowser

Adjunct: Randall Butler, Susan Cherne, Karen Kaiser, Chloe Northrop

Mission

The mission of the History/Social Science Department is to help students acquire critical, analytical, and communicative skills through mastery of Social Science courses, taught in a Christian context.

Aims of the Department

The department's offerings in history are designed to help the student to understand the present more fully by guiding him in a study of the past and by helping him to reason from cause to effect. The study of history is approached from the biblical viewpoint. “In the annals of human history the growth of nations, the rise and fall of empires, appear as dependent on the will and prowess of man. The shaping of events seems, to a large degree, to be determined by his power, ambition, or caprice. But in the Word of God the curtain is drawn aside, and we behold, behind, above, and through all the play and counter-play of human interests and power and passions, the agencies of the all-merciful One, silently, patiently working out the counsel of His own will.” E. G. White, EDUCATION, p. 173.

In political science, the student traces the development, functions, and operation of national, local, and foreign governments.

CRIJ 101 : Introduction to Criminal Justice

An overview of the historical and organizational development of police systems. Emphasis is placed on the function and organizational structure of law enforcement agencies and how these agencies interface with other components of the criminal justice system.

credits

3

CRIJ 110 : Court Systems and Practices

The judiciary in the criminal justice system; structure of the American court system; prosecution; right to counsel; pre-trial release; grand juries; adjudication process; types and rules of evidence; sentencing.

credits

3

CRIJ 116 : Juvenile Delinquency

Juvenile delinquency has deep historical roots in social structures. This course focuses on prevention strategies, causes, and responses to juvenile delinquency or deviance. The nature and extent of delinquency is at the core of this course.

credits

3

CRIJ 120 : Crime in America

This course examines the history of crime in America and police efforts to deal with it. Course will pay special attention to 19th Century policing developments in England and their affect on American policing; progressive-era policing reforms; professionalization; constitutional cases; and contemporary trends.

credits

3

CRIJ 130 : Fundamentals of Criminal Law

A study of the nature of criminal law; philosophical and historical development; major definitions and concepts; classification of crimes, elements of crimes and penalties using Texas statutes as illustrations; criminal responsibility.

credits

3

CRIJ 220 : Community Policing

Community policing is contemporary movement to better engage the police with the community they serve. There is no one single method of engagement, rather, a variety of initiatives that are community specific. The goal to community policing is to build bridges between the police and the people they serve.

credits

3

CRIJ 231 : Community Corrections

An overview of the community corrections movement as an alternative to institutional corrections. There are numerous alternative programs to incarceration and this course will explore these alternatives and consider their value in applying justice.

credits

3

CRIJ 311 : Criminal Investigations

An overview of the collection and documentation of evidence. Criminal investigators and peace officers share a responsibility to secure crime scenes, collect evidence and protect the chain of custody, and report findings in a timely manner. This course focuses on the policies and procedures associated with criminal investigations.

credits

3

CRIJ 325 : Criminology

An overview of the major causal theories of criminal behavior and examination of the social, political, economic, and intellectual milieu within which each arose. Beginning with early 18th century theories, the course focuses on the sociological constructs of criminality.

credits

3

Prerequisites

or permission of instructor.

CRIJ 430 : Ethics in Criminal Justice

This course examines ethical issues in crime and justice. Students will discuss such issues as discretion, corruption, use of force, racism, deception, professionalism, and the nature and meaning of justice.

credits

3

CRIJ 434 : Criminal Justice Administration and Management

The administration and management of law enforcement organizations is complex and involves both organizational structure and personnel behavior. This class focuses on the theory of organizations, management of personnel, occupational stress, motivation theory, principles of leadership, and the process of managing and promoting change in a highly structured environment.

credits

3

HIST 111 : United States History to 1865

A brief account of the discoveries, colonization, and the struggle for independence; growth of federal government, expansion of territory, and the Civil War.

credits

3

HIST 201 : Historical Methods: Research and Historiography

An introduction to the skills used in the profession of history. Students will use primary and secondary sources as well as historical journals, indexes, and databases as they produce a major research paper, bibliography, and book review; prepare a presentation based on their work; and engage in other activities relative to critical thinking within the discipline of history. Students will also be exposed to basic trends in historiography. Within this class, history/social science majors begin the process of senior portfolio development.

credits

3

Prerequisites

HIST 204 : Advanced American History, 1866-Present

This course provides a detailed study of American history from Reconstruction to the present, charting the United States' rise from a frontier nation to a world power. This course covers the turbulent days of post-Civil War Reconstruction and the settlement of the west, booming industrialism, Populism and Progressivism, the United States in World Wars I & II, the Cold War, and the distrust of the post-Watergate era. Students will become acquainted with trends in American historiography and practice the skills of historical interpretation and writing. The class satisfies general education requirements for history. It is required for history/social science majors. Students taking this course should not take HIST 112, American History, 1866-Present.

credits

3

HIST 208 : Advanced World Civilizations, early times to the 16th Century

This course is an introductory survey of world history from prehistory to 1400. Through reading, lectures, discussion, and writing you will gain an elementary understanding of the sub-discipline of world history and the major places, civilizations, events, personalities, and issues of modern world history. This course will also display how history can inform our understanding of contemporary events.

credits

3

HIST 221 : History of Western Art

A survey of fine arts and how they have related to the various cultures throughout western civilization. The class will deal with the arts from the Renaissance to the present time. (Also taught as ARTS 221)

credits

3

HIST 225 : World Civilizations I

This course is an introductory survey of world history from prehistory to 1400. Through reading, lectures, discussion, and writing you will gain an elementary understanding of the sub-discipline of world history and the major places, civilizations, events, personalities, and issues of modern world history. This course will also display how history can inform our understanding of contemporary events.

credits

3

HIST 226 : World Civilizations II

This course is an introductory survey of world history from 1400 to present. Through reading, lectures, discussion, and writing you will gain an elementary understanding of the sub-discipline of world history and the major places, civilizations, events, personalities, and issues of modern world history. This course will also display how history can inform our understanding of contemporary events.

credits

3

HIST 298 : Individual Study Topics

Designed for the student who wishes to do independent study or research. Content and method of study must be arranged prior to registration. May be repeated for a total of 3 credits.

credits

1 - 3

Prerequisites

Approval of department chair

HIST 299 : Directed Group Study Topics

Provides academic departments an opportunity to offer courses in specialized or experimental areas, either lower or upper division, not listed in the undergraduate Bulletin.  . May be repeated for a total of 3 credits.

credits

1 - 3

Prerequisites

Approval by department chair

HIST 315 : Political Thought

History of Political Thought is a study of political thinking and key political philosophers in history, particularly those that have most profoundly influenced the political culture and institutions of our own continent.  It is an introductory survey of political ideas, addressing perennial issues of human society, leadership, power, rights, and government.

Also taught as POLS 315 and HNRS 315.

credits

3

HIST 320 : American International Relations

Details American foreign policies and diplomatic relations toward Europe, Latin America, and Asia, from the revolutionary era to the present. Will detail major foreign policy decisions and initiatives and the results of each. (Also taught as POLS 320)

credits

3

HIST 326 : From Colony to Nation, 1607-1783

A study of the creation of the American nation. The course examines how transplanted Europeans became a new people, emphasizing social, political, and economic changes that led to independence. Includes a discussion of the impact of African slavery upon American democracy. 

credits

3

HIST 331 : History of Christianity I

A study of the rise and impact of Christianity in the Roman world and western culture. Attention is given to theological and social movements, the influence of Islam, the crusades, expansionism, and religious adaptation to modern life. The second semester traces development from the Reformation through the growth of American religion. (Also taught as RLGN 331, 332)

credits

3

HIST 332 : History of Christianity II

A study of the rise and impact of Christianity in the Roman world and western culture. Attention is given to theological and social movements, the influence of Islam, the crusades, expansionism, and religious adaptation to modern life. The second semester traces development from the Reformation through the growth of American religion. (Also taught as RLGN 331, 332)

credits

3

HIST 355 : Reconstruction and Reunion, 1865-1917

American history from the close of the Civil War to the US entry into World War I. Among the topics examined in this course are Reconstruction and the New South, industrialization, the "winning of the West," immigration, and America's changing world role.

credits

3

HIST 360 : History of the British Isles

A study Britain from pre-Roman times through the restoration of the monarchy under William and Mary in 1688. Topics include Anglo-Saxon England, the Norman Conquest, the Wars of the Roses, the Tudor and Stuart dynasties, and the English Civil War.

credits

3

HIST 364 : Ancient Cultures

This is a study of man from his beginning through the empires of Assyria, Babylon, Egypt, Persia, Israel, Greece, and Rome to the end of the Roman Republic.

credits

3

HIST 370 : East Asian History

A survey of the history of East Asia, primarily China, Korea, and Japan, from its foundations until modern times. Topics will include China's enduring influence over its neighbors, interactions with and isolation from the West, the emergence and growth of Buddhism, the influence of Confucian philosophy, Chinese and Japanese imperialism, Western imperialism in East Asia, and Nationalism and Communism.

credits

3

HIST 414 : Early Modern Europe

A survey of the Renaissance, Reformation, counter-Reformation, Absolutism, competition for empire, the Scientific Revolution, the Enlightenment, and the coming of Revolutions.

credits

3

HIST 415 : Texas and the West

A study of the multi-cultural heritage of Texas and the West with special emphasis on the pre-Columbian Native American cultures; Spanish, Mexican, and Anglo-American colonization; the annexation of the region to the US; and social, political, and industrial developments up to the present.

credits

3

HIST 424 : Modern Europe

A study of the Intellectual and Industrial Revolution, the New Imperialism, the intensification of Nationalism, World War I, the Depression, the development and spread of Fascism and Communism, World War II, the Cold War, Decolonization and the emergence of a multipolar world.

credits

3

HIST 425 : Executive Leadership

A study of leadership styles and their impact on politics and history. Examines the elements of leadership by focusing on different figures from the political, military, and corporate arenas, such as Ulysses S. Grant, Andrew Carnegie, Alexander the Great, and Winston Churchill. Students will be able to take information gained from this class and apply it to a variety of life situations. (Also taught as POLS 425.)

credits

3

HIST 430 : Medieval Europe

A study of European history during the middle ages, approximately 500-1500 A.D. Course topics include feudalism, monasticism, the growth of monarchies, the Crusades, heresy and inquisition, the commercial revolution, the Hundred Years' War, the Bubonic Plague, and the advent of the university.

credits

3

HIST 475 : Portfolio Development

In this class, departmental majors will meet at arranged times with departmental faculty to finalize the contents of their portfolio before graduation. Students will also complete their senior thesis in this course. This class is required of majors in History, Social Science, Social Science (emphasis International Relations), and Social Studies, Secondary Education. Students should take the class in their last semester before graduation; however, they may take it both semesters of their senior year upon advisor recommendation.

credits

1

HIST 492 : History/Social Science Internship

Students in the History, International Relations, and Public Policy major will take three hours of internship work. This may be three hours at one internship agency, or divided among different agencies in one-hour increments. Students will meet with departmental faculty and agency representatives to agree on an internship contract before beginning the course. The internship(s) will enable students to work directly in an area of their interest, give them experience vital in job searches, and give them an advantage when seeking graduate education. Eligible for IP grading.

credits

1 - 3

HIST 498 : Individual Study Topics

Designed for the student who wishes to do independent study or research. Content and method of study must be arranged prior to registration. May be repeated for a total of 3 credits.

credits

1 - 3

Prerequisites

Approval of department chair

HIST 499 : Directed Group Study Topics

Provides academic departments an opportunity to offer courses in specialized or experimental areas, either lower or upper division, not listed in the undergraduate Bulletin.  Student may be allowed to repeat the course for credit.

credits

1 - 3

Prerequisites

Approval by department chair

POLS 110 : Court Systems and Practices

The judiciary in the criminal justice system; structure of the American court system; prosecution; right to counsel; pre-trial release; grand juries; adjudication process; types and rules of evidence; sentencing.

credits

3

POLS 120 : Crime in America

This course examines the history of crime in America and police efforts to deal with it. Course will pay special attention to 19th Century policing developments in England and their affect on American policing; progressive-era policing reforms; professionalization; constitutional cases; and contemporary trends.

credits

3

POLS 130 : Fundamentals of Criminal Law

A study of the nature of criminal law; philosophical and historical development; major definitions and concepts; classification of crimes, elements of crimes and penalties using Texas statutes as illustrations; criminal responsibility.

credits

3

POLS 211 : National and Texas Constitutions

This is a comprehensive treatment of U.S. and Texas Constitutions. The course deals with the formation of these constitutions and the governments which were established as a result. This course fulfills the government requirements as established by the Texas Education Agency.

credits

3

POLS 220 : Introduction to Public Policy

An introduction to the history and implementation of American public policies. The course will examine the historical context of key public policies, their creation and implementation, and their success of failure. The course will also explore the various constituencies and agencies involved in the formation of public policy. The course will focus largely on federal policies, but delve into state and local policy formation as well.

credits

3

POLS 298 : Individual Study Topics

Designed for the student who wishes to do independent study research. Content and method of study must be arranged prior to registration. May be repeated for a total of 3 credits.

credits

1 - 3

Prerequisites

Approval of department chair

POLS 299 : Directed Group Study Topics

Provides academic departments an opportunity to offer courses in specialized or experimental areas, either lower or upper division, not listed in the undergraduate Bulletin.  May be repeated for a total of 3 credits.

credits

1 - 3

Prerequisites

Approval by department chair

POLS 315 : Political Thought

History of Political Thought is a study of political thinking and key political philosophers in history, particularly those that have most profoundly influenced the political culture and institutions of our own continent.  It is an introductory survey of political ideas, addressing perennial issues of human society, leadership, power, rights, and government.

Also taught as HIST 315 and HNRS 315.

credits

3

POLS 320 : American International Relations

Details American foreign policies and diplomatic relations toward Europe, Latin America, and Asia, from the revolutionary era to the present. Will detail major foreign policy decisions and initiatives and the results of each. (Also taught as HIST 320.)

credits

3

POLS 360 : American National Government

The organization, functions, and processes of America's national government, with particular attention to constitutional framework, the judiciary, Congress, the presidency, political parties, interest groups, and the individuals as citizen.

credits

3

POLS 425 : Executive Leadership

A study of leadership styles and their impact on politics and history. Examines the elements of leadership by focusing on different figures from the political, military, and corporate arenas, such as Ulysses S. Grant, Andrew Carnegie, Alexander the Great, and Winston Churchill. Students will be able to take information gained from this class and apply it to a variety of life situations. (Also taught as HIST 425.)

credits

3

POLS 492 : Political Science Internship

Students in the History, International Relations, and Public Policy major will take three hours of internship work. This may be three hours at one internship agency, or divided among different agencies in one-hour increments. Students will meet with departmental faculty and agency representatives to agree on an internship contract before beginning the course. The internship(s) will enable students to work directly in an area of their interest, give them experience vital in job searches, and give them an advantage when seeking graduate education. Eligible for IP grading.

credits

1 - 3

POLS 498 : Individual Study Topics

Designed for the student who wishes to do independent study research. Content and method of study must be arranged prior to registration. May be repeated for a total of 3 credits.

credits

1 - 3

POLS 499 : Directed Group Study Topics

Provides academic departments an opportunity to offer courses in specialized or experimental areas, either lower or upper division, not listed in the undergraduate Bulletin.  Student may be allowed to repeat the course for credit.

credits

1 - 3

Prerequisites

Approval by department chair

SOCI 111 : Introduction to Sociology

A general survey of sociology and many of the areas of investigation in sociology; these areas will include the family, race and ethnic relations, social class, formal organizations, collective behavior, population problems and dynamics, culture, etc. Additionally, a brief introduction to the scientific methods and theories utilized in the study of society will be presented.

credits

3