Southwestern Adventist University

Undergraduate Bulletin 2017-2018 PDF

Core Curriculum & Graduation

General Education (Click for more info)

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Core Curriculum for a Bachelor's Degree

I. English Composition

Courses in English composition will emphasize the practice of critical reading and effective writing.

Select two courses: 6 credit hours

  • ENGL 121     Freshman Composition
  • ENGL 220     Research Writing

II. Mathematics                                                                                               

Courses in mathematics will emphasize quantitative and deductive reasoning, problem solving and logical thinking, organizational and systematic thinking, and the application of mathematics to various life situations.

Select one course: 3 credit hours

  • MATH 110           College Algebra
  • MATH 121           Precalculus
  • MATH 131           Applied Mathematics
  • MATH 181           Calculus I
  • MATH 241           Intro to Probability & Statistics

III. Whole-Person Wellness

Courses in fitness activity will emphasize practical knowledge and practices that will promote life-long whole-person wellness.

Select two courses: 2 credit hours

  • KINAxxx
  • KINAxxx                                                        

IV. Humanities

Courses in the humanities will emphasize a reflection on the human experience and human condition through literary texts and artistic forms.

A. Literature

Select one course: 3 credit hours

  • ENGL 221, 222    World Masterpieces
  • ENGL 224             Survey of English Literature
  • ENGL 231, 232    American Literature I, II
  • ENGL 322             Literary Perspectives

B. Fine Arts

Select one course:  3 credit hours

  • ARTS 291            Art Appreciation
  • ENGL 272            Introduction to Drama
  • MUHL 221          Survey of Music

V. Life and Physical Science

Courses in science will emphasize understanding and application of everyday phenomena. Laboratories will be discovery based and emphasize the development and testing of hypotheses, or they may expose students to observational experiences that enhance scientific understanding.

A. Life Science

Select one course: 4 credit hours

  • BIOL 101 or 102   Anatomy and Physiology I or II
  • BIOL 103                Human Biology 
  • BIOL 111 or 112    General Biology I or II
  • BIOL 220                Microbiology and Immunology
  • BIOL 225                Field Biology
  • BIOL 345                Environment & Mankind

 B. Physical Science                                                                          

Select one course:  4 credit hours

  • CHEM 105          Survey of Chemistry
  • CHEM 111          General Chemistry I
  • PHYS 101            Introductory Physics
  • PHYS 114            Physical Science
  • PHYS 121            General Physics I
VI. History and Social Science

Courses in history and social science are designed to give students a broad understanding of the sweep of world historical, governmental, and cultural events. Through reading, lectures, discussions, and writing, these courses will enhance the critical abilities of students by providing tools and practice that are universal in application.  Ultimately, students should be better able to understand contemporary events by grasping how historical, political, and cultural events have combined to create the world in which they live.

A. History                                                                                           

Select two courses: 6 credit hours

  • HIST 111           American History, 1492-1865
  • HIST 112           American History, 1866 - Present
  • HIST 225           World Civilizations I
  • HIST 226           World Civilizations II

B. Social Science

Select one course: 3 credit hours

  • ECON 211       Macroeconomics
  • ECON 212       Microeconomics
  • POLS 211        National and Texas Constitutions
  • PSYC 212        General Psychology
  • PSYC 220        Human Growth & Development
  • SOCI 111         Introduction to Sociology

VII. Religion

Courses in biblical studies will introduce the student to practical methods of Bible study, critical evaluation of scholarship and interpretation, and the richness and depth of the biblical text. Courses in theology will engage the student in a systematic approach to biblical matters, will have students explore different perspectives and relevant issues, and guide students to formulate personal viewpoints and positions. Courses in historical studies trace the origin and development of the Bible, Christianity, Seventh-day Adventism, and other religions.

Select four courses: 12 credit hours

A maximum of 2 courses can be taken in any one area. One course must be numbered 300 and above. Transfer students from a non-SDA college must complete one course for each academic year in attendance, with a minimum of 2 courses (one in Biblical Studies).

A. Biblical Studies            

  • RELB 211                 Life and Teachings of Jesus
  • RELB 313                 Prophetic Studies
  • RELB 315 or 316    Old Testament I or II
  • RELB 339                 New Testament I:  Gospels
  • RELB 340                 New Testament II:  Letters

B. Theological Studies

  • RELT 101                  Christian Beliefs
  • RELT 212                  Christian Ethics
  • RELT 360                  Philosophy & the Christian Worldview
  • RELT 419                  Philosophy of Science

C. Historical Studies

  • RELH230                  History of the SDA Church
  • RELH 233                 Biblical Archaeology
  • RELH 314                 History of the Bible
  • RELH 320                 Ellen White Writings
  • RELH 331 or 332    History of Christianity I or II

VIII. Competence in Computer Applications

Students completing a degree must be proficient in the use of general computer applications and important software in the field of the student's major. Proficiency will be determined by the completion of a department-designated course or courses.

The Bulletin description of approved courses includes the statement "This course fulfills the Computer Competency requirement as specified in the Core Curriculum."  Unless specified in the major, the following courses meet the proficiency requirement: 

  • CSIS 102                 Microcomputer Literacy and Applications
  • CSIS 104                 Spreadsheet and Database Applications
  • CSIS 106                 Comprehensive Spreadsheets

IX. Competence in Communication

Students completing a degree must be proficient in the application of the principles of effective oral communication including discussion techniques and public presentations. Proficiency will be determined by the completion of a department designated course or courses.

The Bulletin description of approved courses includes the statement "This course fulfills the Communication Competency requirement as specified in the Core Curriculum."    Unless specified in the major, the following courses meet the proficiency requirement:    

  • COMM 111            Speech
  • COMM 113            Oral Interpretation
  • COMM 115            Discussion Techniques

Total GE Credit Hours: 46

B.A. Foreign Language Requirement

Complete either 6 semester credit hours of one foreign language at the intermediate level or 8 semester credit hours each of two foreign languages at the elementary level.

Baccalaureate Degree Requirements

The University awards four types of baccalaureate degrees: the Bachelor of Arts, the Bachelor of Science, the Bachelor of Music, Bachelor of Music Education and the Bachelor of Business Administration.  Candidates who have completed the following requirements will be awarded degrees upon recommendation by the faculty and approval by the Board of Trustees.

All baccalaureate graduates will

  • Complete a minimum of 120 semester credit hours, including 40 credit hours in courses numbered 300 and above and  earn a minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.00.
  • Complete the general education requirements.
  • Complete QEP requirement UNIV 111 Wellness for Life.
  • Complete a minimum of 30 semester credit hours in residence. The last 36 credit hours earned prior to graduation must include 30 credit hours in residence.
  • Complete the requirements for a major field of specialization with a minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.25, unless otherwise specified by major department.  No class with a grade below a C- may apply toward the major or area of emphasis. Classes listed as cognates are included in the major. A minimum of 12 hours in the major field must be taken in residence.
  • Take a comprehensive examination in the field of study as designated by the major.
  • General Education Assessment.

Bachelor of Arts graduates will also

  • Complete a minor field of specialization.  No class with a grade below a C- may apply toward the minor, and a minimum of 6 hours in the minor field must be taken in residence.

Graduates with Nursing and Elementary Education majors have modified degree requirements and these are specified under the respective department sections in this Bulletin. 

Double majors must be completed within a single degree such as a Bachelor of Arts or a Bachelor of Science.  To receive a degree with a double major, a student must complete all of the requirements, including cognates, of each major or area of emphasis. A second major will satisfy the requirement for a minor for the Bachelor of Arts degree. A student cannot earn two majors or areas of emphasis in communication.

Two baccalaureate degrees such as a Bachelor of Arts and a Bachelor of Science with majors in different disciplines may be awarded concurrently or sequentially.  The candidate must meet all the degree requirements for each major including cognates, general education, the foreign language requirement, the requirement of a minor, a total of 150 semester credit hours, and 30 credit hours in residence.

Core Curriculum for an Associate in Science Degree

I. English Composition

Courses in English composition will emphasize the practice of critical reading and effective writing.

Select two courses: 6 credit hours

  • ENGL 121 Freshman Composition
  • ENGL 220 Research Writing

II. Mathematics

Courses in mathematics will emphasize quantitative and deductive reasoning, problem solving and logical thinking, organizational and systematic thinking, and the application of mathematics to various life situations.

Select one course: 3 credit hours

  • MATH 110 College Algebra
  • MATH 121 Precalculus
  • MATH 131 Applied Mathematics
  • MATH 181 Calculus I
  • MATH 241 Intro to Probability & Statistics

III. Whole-Person Wellness

Courses in fitness activity will emphasize practical knowledge and practices that will promote life-long whole-person wellness.

Select one course: 1 credit hour

  • KINAxxx

IV. Humanities

Courses in the humanities will emphasize a reflection on the human experience and human condition through literary texts and artistic forms.

Select one course: 3 credit hours

  • ENGL 221, 222 World Masterpieces
  • ENGL 224 Survey of English Literature
  • ENGL 231, 232 American Literature I, II
  • ENGL 272 Introduction to Drama
  • MUHL 221 Survey of Music

V. Life and Physical Science

Courses in science will emphasize understanding and application of everyday phenomena.  Laboratories will be discovery based and emphasize the development and testing of hypotheses, or they may expose students to observational experiences that enhance scientific understanding.

Select one course:

  • BIOL 101 or 102 Anatomy and Physiology I or II
  • BIOL 103 Human Biology
  • BIOL 111 or 112 General Biology I or II
  • BIOL 220 Microbiology and Immunology
  • BIOL 225 Field Biology
  • CHEM 105 Survey of Chemistry
  • CHEM 111 General Chemistry I
  • PHYS 101 Introductory Physics
  • PHYS 114 Physical Science
  • PHYS 121 General Physics I

VI. History and Social Science

Courses in history and social science are designed to give students a broad understanding of the sweep of world historical, governmental, and cultural events.  Through reading, lectures, discussions, and writing, these courses will enhance the critical abilities of students by providing tools and practice that are universal in application.  Ultimately, students should be better able to understand contemporary events by grasping how historical, political, and cultural events have combined to create the world in which they live.

Select one course: 3 credit hours

  • HIST 111 American History, 1492-1865
  • HIST 112 American History, 1866 to Present
  • HIST 225 World Civilizations I
  • HIST 226 World Civilizations II
  • ECON 211 Macroeconomics
  • ECON 212 Microeconomics
  • POLS 211 National and Texas Constitutions
  • PSYC 212 General Psychology
  • PSYC 220 Human Growth and Development
  • SOCI 111 Introduction to Sociology

VII. Religion

Courses in biblical studies will introduce the student to practical methods of Bible study, critical evaluation of scholarship and interpretation, and the richness and depth of the biblical text. Courses in theology will engage the student in a systematic approach to biblical matters, will have students explore different perspectives and relevant issues, and guide students to formulate personal viewpoints and positions. Courses in historical studies trace the origin and development of the Bible, Christianity, Seventh-day Adventism, and other religions.

Select two courses: 6 credit hours

A. Biblical Studies

  • RELB 211 Life and Teachings of Jesus

B. Theological Studies

  • RELT 101 Christian Beliefs
  • RELT 212 Christian Ethics

C. Historical Studies

  • RELH 230 History of the SDA Church
  • RELH 233 Biblical Archaeology

Total GE Credits Hours: 26

Associate Degree Requirements

The University awards three types of associate degrees: the Associate in Science, the Associate of Science, and the Associate of Applied Science.  Candidates who have completed the following requirements will be awarded degrees upon recommendation by the faculty and approval by the Board of Trustees.

Associate of Science graduates will

  • Complete a minimum of 60 semester credit hours and earn a minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.00
  • Complete a minimum of 24 semester credit hours in residence. 12 of the final 15 hours before graduation, must be taken in residence at Southwestern
  • Complete QEP requirement UNIV 111 Wellness for Life

Associate in Science graduates will

  • Complete a minimum of 60 semester credit hours and earn a minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.00
  • Complete a minimum of 24 semester credit hours in residence.  12 of the final 15 hours before graduation, must be taken in residence at Southwestern
  • Complete a major field of specialization with a minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.00 in the major.  no class with a grade below C- may apply toward the major
  • Complete the general education requirements for the Associate in Science degree
  • Complete QEP requirement UNIV 111 Wellness for Life

Core Curriculum for an Associate of Applied Science Degree

Associate of Applied Science graduates will complete the requirements as specified in the Fire Science section of this Bulletin.

Graduation Procedures for All Degrees

A graduating student will fulfill all degree requirements published in the Bulletin. The student may complete the degree requirements published in the Bulletin at the time of admission or any Bulletin issued during continuous enrollment.  All general requirements for graduation must be fulfilled as published in the current Bulletin.

A Graduation Contract must be completed and returned to the Registrar no later than one week after the start of the second semester of the student's junior year.

Any work taken at another institution must be recorded on the transcript before the degree is awarded.

The student must satisfactorily meet all financial obligations to the University, including payment of graduation dues, in order to obtain a diploma or transcript showing graduation. Graduation class dues are a mandatory non-refundable fee that covers expenses such as class gift, 25 graduation announcements and miscellaneous class activities.  This fee applies to campus as well as Adult Degree Program students.  When a student returns to obtain an additional degree and graduation dues were paid as an initial Southwestern graduate, only half of the dues will be required for each subsequent graduation class.  Graduation dues are charged to the student account at the beginning of the semester in which the student will graduate.

All graduates are expected to participate in the commencement exercises unless given permission by the Vice President for Academic Administration to graduate in absentia.

Candidates will receive instructions on ordering graduation regalia and announcements at the senior class meeting.

Graduation Ceremonies

The commencement ceremony is held at the end of the spring semester each year. Students eligible to participate in graduation must complete all arrangements with the Registrar by March 15 to be included in the  ceremony. 

Deferred Graduation

Students who have fewer than 6 hours or two courses remaining in their degree program, as documented on their graduation contract, may participate in graduation exercises.  The student will be listed as a candidate for graduation in the graduation program.  All SWAU residency requirements apply to deferred graduation.  All degree requirements must be completed within six (6) years of the date of the catalog selected.

Graduation Honors

Honors status will be calculated for bachelor's degree graduates after the final semester grades are issued. The following designations are given to graduates who have maintained high GPAs.

  • GPA of 3.50 to 3.74 may graduate cum laude
  • GPA of 3.75 to 3.89 may graduate magna cum laude
  • GPA of 3.90 to 4.00 may graduate summa cum laude

The associate degree candidate who has maintained a cumulative GPA of at least 3.60 may graduate with distinction.

Honors Program Graduate

Honors Program students may graduate with the designation of Honors Program Graduate by meeting the requirements outlined under the Honors Program in this Bulletin.

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